INTRO

INTRO

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Intro to the Designer

Intro to the Designer

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2:48

Intro to HTML & CSS

Intro to HTML & CSS

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3:38

HTML Structure

HTML Structure

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1:55

WEB STRUCTURE

WEB STRUCTURE

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The Box Model

The Box Model

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1:54

Element Hierarchy

Element Hierarchy

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3:57

Navigator Panel

Navigator Panel

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2:45

ELEMENTS

ELEMENTS

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Element Panel

Element Panel

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1:49

Section

Section

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4:14

Container

Container

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2:44

Columns

Columns

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2:22

Div block

Div block

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3:37

Buttons & Links

Buttons & Links

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Button

Button

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14:08

Link Block

Link Block

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9:35

Text Link

Text Link

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1:16

Typography

Typography

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3:20

Heading

Heading

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2:02

Paragraph

Paragraph

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4:42

Rich Text

Rich Text

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3:52

Text Block

Text Block

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0:56

Block Quote

Block Quote

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0:42

List

List

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2:31

Media

Media

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Image

Image

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3:39

Image File Types

Image File Types

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2:22

Image Resolution

Image Resolution

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3:28

Assets Panel

Assets Panel

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3:08

Video

Video

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1:20

Background Video

Background Video

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3:15

Components

Components

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Intro to Forms

Intro to Forms

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4:55

Styling Forms

Styling Forms

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2:55

Navbar

Navbar

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9:38

Styling a Navbar

Styling a Navbar

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4:34

Navbar Menu Button

Navbar Menu Button

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4:51

Slider

Slider

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4:56

Tabs

Tabs

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4:38

Lightbox

Lightbox

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3:44

Map

Map

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2:58

Dropdown

Dropdown

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4:38

Social Media Buttons

Social Media Buttons

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2:49

Custom Code Embed

Custom Code Embed

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1:24

Symbols

Symbols

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3:47

Styling Basics

Styling Basics

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Intro to Style Panel

Intro to Style Panel

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3:15

HTML Tags

HTML Tags

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3:59

Classes

Classes

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2:46

Combo Classes

Combo Classes

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4:05

Text Style Inheritance

Text Style Inheritance

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3:18

Style Manager

Style Manager

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1:56

States

States

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2:47

Transitions

Transitions

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2:40

Color Picker & Swatches

Color Picker & Swatches

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3:51

Color Values

Color Values

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3:22

Layout Basics

Layout Basics

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Intro to Web Layout

Intro to Web Layout

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2:27

Display Settings

Display Settings

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2:54

Padding & Margin

Padding & Margin

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2:48

Width & Height Units

Width & Height Units

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3:59

Floats & Clears

Floats & Clears

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1:52

Flexbox & Grid

Flexbox & Grid

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Intro to Flexbox

Intro to Flexbox

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2:27

Centering elements with Flexbox

Centering elements with Flexbox

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1:20

Equal height layouts with Flexbox

Equal height layouts with Flexbox

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1:47

Grid layouts overview

Grid layouts overview

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4:18

Flexbox vs. Grid

Flexbox vs. Grid

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4:00

Advanced Layout

Advanced Layout

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Positioning Overview

Positioning Overview

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1:48

Relative Positioning

Relative Positioning

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1:43

Absolute Positioning

Absolute Positioning

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1:43

Fixed Positioning

Fixed Positioning

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1:27

Z-Index

Z-Index

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1:49

Overflow

Overflow

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1:49

Styling Typography

Styling Typography

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Intro to Web Typography

Intro to Web Typography

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3:20

Typography Units

Typography Units

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2:43

Line Height

Line Height

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1:38

Advanced Typography Styles

Advanced Typography Styles

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3:01

Google Fonts

Google Fonts

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1:18

Custom Fonts

Custom Fonts

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1:27

Text Shadow

Text Shadow

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2:36

Background & Border Styles

Background & Border Styles

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Background Styles Overview

Background Styles Overview

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2:20

Background Image

Background Image

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2:04

Background Gradient

Background Gradient

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3:02

Border

Border

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3:07

Border Radius

Border Radius

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3:22

Box Shadow

Box Shadow

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3:34

3D Styles

3D Styles

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Intro to 3D

Intro to 3D

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2:25

3D Perspective

3D Perspective

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4:01

2D & 3D Transforms

2D & 3D Transforms

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4:53

EFFECTS

EFFECTS

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Opacity

Opacity

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1:44

Filters

Filters

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2:59

Cursors

Cursors

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1:45

Responsive Design

Responsive Design

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new course
CSS grid landing page tutorial (36min)

Lesson info

Lesson info

Understanding your image file options — and when and how to use each — can be key to building great websites. That's why this video focuses on explaining the bitmap, GIF, PNG, JPEG, and SVG image types, and the best use cases for each.

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Transcript

Images and other graphics can often make or break a design. And we’ll start here with file types. And we’re going to focus on bitmap, GIF, PNG, JPEG, and SVG.

Bitmap: Don’t use this on the web.

GIF (or “JIF” depending on what part of the internet you’re from): It’s used for a lot of simple animations. It only supports 256 colors, and if that’s all you need, it might be an option for you. GIFs also allow for transparency, but they don’t support alpha transparency. This means anything other than absolutely opaque or absolutely transparent won’t show up that way.

Up next, we’ve got PNG—or “P.N.G.”: This is a great file format if you need transparency—specifically, if you need alpha transparency.

Of course, we have JPEG—extremely common format. Supports compression, which is awesome, because remember Bitmaps? Yeah, nothing’s changed—we still don’t use those on the web.

But the great thing about JPEG? This JPEG file is just over 300 kilobytes. But this bitmap at the same resolution—same dimensions, is over 50 megabytes. The bitmap…is over 150 times the size. Why?

Well, bitmaps contain precise data about each and every pixel. That’s a ton of information. So when you save a bitmap, think of this patch of gray pixels as being stored as, “gray pixel, gray pixel, gray pixel” and so on. And when creating a JPEG, this area can be pretty compressed, without losing the essence of the image. That means we probably don’t need all this precise, repetitive data for each and every one of these pixels. So JPEG is a pretty great, flexible format.

Finally, we have SVG—scalable vector graphics. The wonderful thing about vector graphics is that instead of having fixed pixels like you would in any of the other formats, SVGs aren’t resolution-dependent.

You can scale them infinitely with really great results. And in most cases, SVGs are used for shapes, text, sketches, logos—but for photographs, which are made up of actual pixels, you’re much better off choosing one of the other formats.

So…that’s our contingent of common file formats. We’re going to make bitmap tiny and red and strikethrough and move it almost entirely off the screen so it’s clear we really don’t like using that format on the web. But that’s our list of common file types. You can mix and match these depending on what works best for each image in your project.